Manufacturers

Culture Shock, Everything Box Set

After the Subhumans split up Culture Shock arose from the ashes, with a (then) unique reggae/dub/punk sound and political lyrics. This box set includes 3 CD's of all their recorded work remastered for the first time and a booklet of their lyrics and history.

More details


£7.73

Availability: we've got plenty!

More info and stuff at the Culture Shock website!

 

 This is the second pressing! So a few spelling mistakes and tweeks were sorted out with the artwork but the discs remain the same.

 

It was 1986 and I was at Swansea University pretending to study anthropology when my housemate and punk rock comrade Dan announced he was going to a gig in Cardiff by a band called Culture Shock. Dan and I had got pretty close what with going out cycling, organizing gigs, fly posting, causing the local McDonalds as much trouble as we dared, hunt sabbing and doing an anarchist paper called Black Sheep. English (English)So I was wondering who the fuck this band was but didn’t ask it as I was planning something more comfortable for the evening. Later I realised that Dan’s omission to explain who Culture Shock were was pure meanness on his part, he knew that The Subhuman’s  The Day the Country Died was one of the tapes that rarely went far from my cassette deck. When he got back late that night exhilarated by another successful train fare dodge with the Shrapnel lads from Briton Ferry he confessed that Culture Shock was the new band of Dick (Lucas) of the Subhumans. I tried not too look too hurt and was so relieved to hear that Culture Shock weren’t a punk band but a ska band! Ha! What a disappointment that was gonna be! images of Two Tone, and men in suits with brass instruments came to mind.

 

How wrong I was. it wasn’t long before we had the band down at the Student Union Mandela Bar for a Hunt Sab benefit gig notable that night for a useless PA which Dick struggled through with his usual wit and enthusiasm. Culture Shock had for that time a unique sound, a mash of ska rhythm; reggae beat with punk vocals and attitude. They were so good and the PA so bad that night that we brought them back a month later to do it better for another benefit.

 

I went on to see Culture Shock’s infectious tunes get people moving at gigs all over the country including many of the Free Festivals that they were so keen to be part of even when there was usually little equipment, no money and plenty of police hassle on offer. Pretty soon their song Stonehenge became the one always demanded for encores regardless of whether it had already been played.  Watching them play you could see that Dick had the energy and drive to sing and jump about all night as well as to illuminate the inevitable broken string gaps with witty tales and his trade mark very personal political banter or sometimes just weird whoop whoop noises! The others seemed content to leave him to it and concentrate on having a good time and playing as well as they could.

 

They played mostly in the anarcho punk scene and had to contend with many an ungrateful punk (such as myself) heckling them to play Subhumans classics till their last gig in 1989. Their music was though a welcome break to the dirge that was becoming fashionable within the punk scene as bands seemed to lose their drive to do something special but instead to sound as devastatingly noise-some as they could. Culture Shock gave everyone a chance to dance, prance and jump about in that speedy reggae-ish non-aggressive manner that meant the bruises from the macho punx could heal a bit and we could actually have fun. I remember one gig at the Bath Longacre Hall after a long day hunt sabbing when they played with Chumbawamba and Atavistic. The crowd for the most part tried to throw themselves about to the frantic pace of Atavistic or just gawped stupefied by the noise. Then they stood in awe as Chumba’s did their theatrical stage show and finally danced as madmen and women when Culture Shock took to the stage (it may have played in a different order). It was always good to meet up with Dick and the others at festivals, demo’s and the like, they never acted self importantly, like so many bands do, sometimes they were too drunk to have a sensible conversation with but they were always up for helping out giving you a lift home if there was space in their van, helping persuade a promoter that there should be space for my bookstall or driving miles to play a benefit for not much more than the petrol cost if that! My most treasured moment of them remains an evening during the 1987 struggle to hold a Stonehenge festival. We were a large group of walkers, cyclists (well there was Dan and me!) and some “Convoy” vehicles parked up on some marshy land by Collingbourne (?) As evening began a small tarp was put up over an even smaller stage and what almost passed as a vocal PA began to play music. When Culture Shock started up their audience couldn’t have been more than 30 people but they were hard-core fans. Then after a few songs the generator ran out of fuel, a familiar tale at such events, I mean who wants to watch the petrol level on a “genny” when there’s hash browns to eat and special brew to sup? Dick found his mike no longer effective so he started a song he knew we all would know. Pretty soon everyone was singing along to “When the people of the country have forgotten how to disagree……” it’s a Subhumans song but was a great Culture Shock moment.

 

Culture Shock eventually called it a day in 1989 as family pressures became too much for Bill and Nigel. Dick went on to form Citizen Fish with some of the Subhumans and they too reformed to keep both bands pretty busy to this day. Reforming Culture Shock became a 'no no' after Nigel killed himself in 1993 whether it was ever considered or not. Someone more adept at band details once described Culture Shock thus “ (they) were one of the rare pre-Operation Ivy ska bands, and it really shows. This is ska music, all right, but it's not quite as bouncy and poppy as the ska we're all familiar with. This is a bit darker at times, much looser, filled with reggae elements and a bit of jazz here and there. It's quite an interesting musical experience, and to top it all off, you've got Dick's vocals.” Interesting enough for us to want to put this discography package together in homage to a band that inspired and were much admired.

 

 

Jon @ctive

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cart  

No products

£0.00 Shipping
£0.00 Total

Cart Check out

New products

  • The Bottled Wasp 2017 Diary
  • Maximum Rocknroll *401 Oct 2016
The Bottled Wasp 2017 Diary
The Bottled Wasp project is a not-for-profit fundraiser, with all...
Read more
Maximum Rocknroll *401 Oct 2016
Special MRR Art Issue! Featuring MRR artist-in-residence Olivia Gibb,...
Read more
Church Illumination sticker
The only church that illuminates is a burning church
Read more
Emma Goldman Ignorance sticker
The most violent element in society is ignorance.
Read more
Fuck Law and Order sticker
Fuck Law and Order sticker
Read more
Free Leonard Peltier poster sticker
Free Leonard Peltier poster sticker
Read more
Lucy Parsons sticker
“Never be deceived that the rich will allow you to vote away their wealth.”
Read more
Milicias sticker
Milicias sticker
Read more
Police Dog sticker
The pigs are dogs!
Read more
Tear Down the Borders sticker
Tear Down the Borders sticker,  a Steph design we found out there...
Read more
American Hardcore by Steven Blush
Hardcore, the hard-edged second generation of punk rock, whose peak...
Read more
Vegan Goodness by Jessica Prescott
Vegan Goodness: Delicious Plant-Based Recipes That Can Be Enjoyed...
Read more
The First Socialist Schism: Bakunin vs. Marx in the I.W.M.A..
The First Socialist Schism: Bakunin vs. Marx in the International...
Read more
Antipolitika, Issue 1 , June 2016
Antipolitika – anarchist journal from the Balkans. This first issue...
Read more
Home from the Dark Side of Utopia by Clifton Ross
Home from the Dark Side of Utopia A Journey Through American Revolutions...
Read more
Len, A Lawyer in History A Graphic Biography of Radical Attorney Leonard Weinglass
Len, A Lawyer in History A Graphic Biography of Radical Attorney Leonard...
Read more
Rebellion in Patagonia by Osvaldo Bayer
Rebellion in Patagonia by Osvaldo Bayer  translated by Paul Sharkey and...
Read more
The Revolution Starts at Home
The Revolution Starts at Home Confronting Intimate Violence Within...
Read more
V is for Vegan by Kerstin Rodgers
V is for Vegan: The ultimate vegan cookbook packed full of amazing...
Read more
Kenko Kitchen by Kate Bradley
Kenko Kitchen: Simple Sugar-Free, Gluten-Free, Vegan Recipes   by Kate...
Read more

» All new products