Manufacturers

17, Anarcha feminist

17, Anarcha feminist

Anarcha-feminism (also called anarcho-feminism or anarchist feminism) constitutes an attempt at drawing out the anarchist tendencies of feminism and the feminist tendencies of anarchism, in order to establish a dialogue between the two traditions. 

More details


£0.25

Availability: we'll make you one!

Anarcha-feminism (also called anarcho-feminism or anarchist feminism) constitutes an attempt at drawing out the anarchist tendencies of feminism and the feminist tendencies of anarchism, in order to establish a dialogue between the two traditions. Anarcho-feminists certainly share some of the ‘traditional’ feminist concerns and objectives (i.e. control over one’s body and sexuality; elimination of sex stereotyping; alternatives to the nuclear family; and the dismantling of patriarchal relationships). These concerns, however, are approached with a critique that aims its focus on power, by asking how power operates and what alternatives exist to it in each context.


Such a critique has been developed, specifically, in response to the male dominated movements of the Left. It can be traced back, at least, to the late 1970’s where in the South East and London Anarchist Libertarian conference arguments broke out over the organization of the conference itself. [1] Realizing that anarchist men were blind to the gender issues facing activist women, anarcho-feminists pushed for an autonomous women’s movement within the anarchist movement and for the small group model which did not alienate women the same way that large scale movements do. As such, the notion of a single overarching movement along with the movement leaders came under fire. In turn, what emerged as a desirable alternative, the autonomous, decentralized group, received criticism [2] from feminists who were concerned that the abandoning of leadership roles would result in a structureless paralysis of revolutionary potential. Nevertheless, anarcho-feminists defended the model claiming that it was a viable revolutionary alternative to the hierarchies found within large scale-movements. As Red Rosa and Black Maria explain: “Two, three, five or ten… individual revolutionaries who know and trust each other intimately can carry out revolutionary acts and make our own policy. As members of a leaderless affinity group, each member participates on an equal level of power, thus negating the hierarchical function of power.” [3]


The anarcho-feminist critique of power coupled with the desire for the elimination of all hierarchies is, in the classical anarchist spirit, particularly aimed at the state. Although anarcho-feminists are concerned about many social contexts, the state receives particular attention as “the ultimate stronghold of male domination”. [4] This position leads anarcho-feminism to distance itself from all other schools of feminist thought which seek to ‘empower’ women by promoting some of them to positions of power. It is here, perhaps, that the most startling and original work of anarcho-feminism emerges. The rejection of matriarchal depictions of women along with the rejection of the worker’s state (or women’s parties) runs counter-intuitive to many feminisms. Yet, anarcho-feminists continue to insist that (revolutionary) women must have no part in an oppressive structure. We can trace the refusal of participation and representation vis-à-vis the state to Emma Goldman, who rejected the project of woman’s suffrage, stating: “I do not believe that woman will make politics worse; nor can I believe that she could make it better. If, then, she cannot improve on man’s mistakes, why perpetrate the latter?” [5] The notion that power in the hands of women would still replicate hierarchies and structures of domination has been developed by anarcho-feminists as a vital critique of political action.


 

Cart  

No products

£0.00 Shipping
£0.00 Total

Cart Check out

New products

  • 2018 London Rebel History Calendar
  • Maximum Rocknroll *415 Dec 2017
2018 London Rebel History Calendar
Rebellious, subversive and campaigning anniversaries from London's...
Read more
Maximum Rocknroll *415 Dec 2017
Anti Police-Terror Project, Portland, OR’s No! To Rape Culture...
Read more
For a Libertarian Communism by Daniel Guerin
Daniel Guérin not only provides a critique of the socialist and...
Read more
Stanley's Exploits, Or, Civilising Africa by D.J. Nicole
David Nicoll was an anarchist militant, active in Sheffield and London a...
Read more
With the Poor People of the Earth
With the Poor People of the Earth: A Biography of Doctor John Creaghe of...
Read more
Divided We Beg ....... sticker
United We Bargain, Divided We Beg and IWW sticker
Read more
La Restencia es fertile ... sticker
La Restencia es fertile , resistance is fertile!
Read more
The Police are here.... sticker
The Police aren't here to protect you from dangerous sociopaths .......
Read more
Anarchy means.... sticker
Anarchy means starting to create a world where we don't have cops and we...
Read more
Biocentric Anarchy
This zine was written in London in 2016 by a person who's considered...
Read more
Rupturing the Dialectic by Harry Cleaver
Rupturing the Dialectic The Struggle against Work, Money, and...
Read more
Guerrillas of Desire by Kevin Van Meter
Guerrillas of Desire Notes on Everyday Resistance and Organizing to Make...
Read more
Knights Errant of Anarchy
Knights Errant of Anarchy London and the Italian Anarchist Diaspora...
Read more
Against the Couple Form / They Who Marry Do Ill
Two articles, a hundred years apart, both provocative. The first, from...
Read more
From Politics to Life by Wolfi Landstreicher
Ridding Anarchy of the Leftist Millstone
Read more
God Only Knows What Devils We Are
God Only Knows What Devils We Are from the Institute for Experimental...
Read more
3 Positions Against Prison by August O'Clairre
The following is a brief but thorough statement on prisons and those who...
Read more
Nietzschemanteion Pocket Oracle
The Nietzschemanteion is a bibliomacy system. It is at once a machine of...
Read more
Spectre At The Feast by Max Hertzberg
Book 3 of the East Berlin Series.
Read more
ORGANISE! * 89 WINTER 2017
Organise! magazine issue 89 Winter 2017 “WE WANT A REVOLUTION … NOW!” 
Read more

» All new products