Manufacturers

Squatting is Recycling .... Badge 8

Squatting is Recycling .... Badge 8

Squatting is the act of occupying an abandoned or unoccupied space or building, usually residential, that the squatter does not own, rent or otherwise have permission to use

More details


£0.30

Availability: we'll make you one!

In many of the world's poorer countries, there are extensive slums or shanty towns, typically built on the edges of major cities and consisting almost entirely of self-constructed housing built without the landowner's permission. While these settlements may, in time, grow to become both legalised and indistinguishable from normal residential neighbourhoods, they start off as squats with minimal basic infrastructure. Thus, there is no sewage systemdrinking water must be bought from vendors or carried from a nearby tap, and if there is electricity, it is stolen from a passing cable.
There is an important distinction to be made between squatting by necessity and squatting as political statement. In this period of global recession and increased housing foreclosures, squatting has become far more prevalent in Western, developed nations. []Obviously, in some cases, need-based and politically motivated squatting go hand in hand. According to Dr. Kesia Reeve, who specializes in housing research, "in the context of adverse housing circumstances, limited housing opportunity and frustrated expectations, squatters effectively remove themselves from and defy the norms of traditional channels of housing consumption and tenure power relations, bypassing the 'rules' of welfare provision."]In effect, beleaguered citizens living in a welfare state that cannot provide them with adequate resources take action into their own hands and squat.
In many countries, squatting is in itself a crime; in others, it is only seen as a civil conflict between the owner and the occupants. "Squatters are usually portrayed as worthless scroungers hell-bent on disrupting society."[] Property law and the state have traditionally favored the property owner. However, in many cases where squatters had de facto ownership, laws have been changed to legitimize their status. Squatters often claim rights over the spaces they have squatted by virtue of occupation, rather than ownership; in this sense, squatting is similar to (and potentially a necessary condition of) adverse possession, by which a possessor of real property without title may eventually gain legal title to the real property.
Anarchist Colin Ward comments: "Squatting is the oldest mode of tenure in the world, and we are all descended from squatters. This is as true of the Queen [of the United Kingdom] with her 176,000 acres (710 km2) as it is of the 54 per cent of householders in Britain who are owner-occupiers. They are all the ultimate recipients of stolen land, for to regard our planet as a commodity offends every conceivable principle of natural rights.""The country is riddled with empty houses and there are thousands of homeless people. When squatters logically put the two together the result can be electrifying, amazing and occasionally disastrous."
Besides being residences, some squats are used as social centres or host give-away shopspirate radio stations or cafés. In Spanish-speaking countries, squatters receive several names, such as okupas in Spain or Argentina (from the verb ocupar meaning "to occupy"), or paracaidistas in Mexico (meaning "paratroopers", because they "parachute" themselves at unoccupied land).
[edit]

 These badges come in a variety of colours

 

Cart  

No products

£0.00 Shipping
£0.00 Total

Cart Check out

New products

  • The counter-economy: Experiments of the anarchist movement
  • Wages for housework
The counter-economy: Experiments of the anarchist movement
Slovenia, SISA and Acerbic distribution 2019
Read more
Wages for housework
by Louise ToupinA history of an international feminist movement...
Read more
After Grenfell
Violence, resistance and responsePluto press 2019
Read more
Unlocking sustainable cities
A manifesto for real change by Paul ChattertonPluto Press 2019
Read more
To exist is to resist
Black Feminism in EuropeEd by Akwugo Emejulu and Francesca SobandePluto...
Read more
Staying Power
The history of black people in Britainby Peter FryerPluto Press 2018
Read more
Class Matters
Inequality and Exploitation in 21st Century Britain by Charles UmneyHow...
Read more
Fighting for spaces, fighting for our lives
Squatting movements todayEdited by the Squatting Everywhere Kollective
Read more
Gone to Croatan
Origins of North American drop out culture Ed by Ron Sakolsky and James...
Read more
Anarchist Speculations
Writing by John MooreArdent Press 2016
Read more
Second wave anarchy
Collection of essays in a pamphlet
Read more
Feral Iconoclasm
by Julian Langer2019
Read more
The Totality is Incomplete
by Alex Garrion Little Black Cart
Read more
Anarchist Cuba
Countercultural politics in the early 20th centuryby Kirwin Shaffer PM...
Read more
The slow burning fuse
The lost history of British anarchistsby John QuailPM/Freedom Press 2019
Read more
Libertarian Socialism
Politics in black and red by Alex Prichard, Ruth Kinna, Saku Pinta, and...
Read more
(H)afrocentric Comics
Volumes 1-4PM Press 2017
Read more
Birth strike
The Hidden Fight over Women’s Work by Jenny BrownPM Press 2019
Read more
Insurgent Supremacists
The U.S. Far Right’s Challenge to State and EmpirePM Press 2018
Read more
Savage Messiah
by Laura Grace Ford  Introduction by Mark Fisher Preface by Greil Marcus
Read more

» All new products