Manufacturers

Julie D’Aubigny sticker

Julie D’Aubigny sticker

Julie D’Aubigny "Le Diable au Corpse"

More details


£0.07

Julie d’Aubigny: sword-slinger, opera singer, and larger-than-life bisexual celebrity of 17th century France. Her life was a whirlwind of duels, seduction, graverobbing, and convent-burning so intense that she had to be pardoned by the king of France twice!.

 

These final years of her career were spent in a relationship with the Madame la Marquise de Florensac, upon whose death La Maupin was inconsolable. She retired from the opera in 1705 and took refuge in a convent, probably in Provence, where she died in 1707 at the age of only 33. She has no known grave.

Julie d'Aubigny (1673–1707), better known as Mademoiselle Maupin or La Maupin, was a 17th-century swordswoman and opera singer. Her tumultuous career and flamboyant life were the subject of gossip and colourful stories in her own time, and inspired numerous portrayals afterwards. Théophile Gautier loosely based the title character, Madeleine de Maupin, of his novel Mademoiselle de Maupin (1835) on her.

The Paris Opéra hired Thévenard in 1690, but initially refused her. She befriended an elderly singer, Bouvard, and he and Thévenard convinced Jean Nicolas Francin, master of the king's household, to accept her into the company. She debuted as Pallas Athena in Cadmus et Hermione by Jean-Baptiste Lully the same year. She performed regularly with the Opéra, first singing as a soprano, and later in her more natural contralto range. The Marquis de Dangeau wrote in his journal of a performance by Maupin given at Trianon of Destouches' Omphale in 1701 that hers was "the most beautiful voice in the world".

In Paris, and later in Brussels, she performed under the name Mademoiselle de Maupin - singers were addressed as 'mademoiselle' whether or not they were married.

Due to Mademoiselle de Maupin's beautiful voice, her acting skill, and her androgynous appearance, she became quite popular with the audience, although her relationship with her fellow actors and actresses was sometimes tempestuous. She famously beat the singer Louis Gaulard Dumesny after he pestered the women members of the troupe, and a legendary duel of wits with Thévenard was the talk of Paris. She also fell in love with Fanchon Moreau, another singer who was the mistress of the Grand Dauphin, and tried to commit suicide when she was rejected.

Her Paris career was interrupted around 1695, when she kissed a young woman at a society ball and was challenged to duels by three different noblemen. She beat them all, but fell afoul of the king's law that forbade duels in Paris. She fled to Brussels to wait for calmer times. There, she was briefly the mistress of Maximilian II EmanuelElector of Bavaria.

While in Brussels, Mademoiselle de Maupin appeared at the Opéra du Quai au Foin from November 1697 to July 1698, after which she returned to the Paris Opéra to replace the retiring Marie Le Rochois. She and her friend d'Albert were both in trouble with the law over the years: he for yet another fatal duel, and she for beating up her landlord.[6]

Until 1705, La Maupin sang in new operas by Pascal CollasseAndré Cardinal Destouches, and André Campra. In 1702, André Campra composed the role of Clorinde in Tancrède specifically for her bas-dessus (contralto) range. She sang for the court at Versailles on a number of occasions, and again performed in many of the Opéra's major productions. She appeared for the last time in La Vénitienne by Michel de La Barre (1705).



 

Cart  

No products

£0.00 Shipping
£0.00 Total

Cart Check out

New products

  • The 43 Group
  • The Anarchist Collectives
The 43 Group
by Morris Beckman, Centreprise 1993
Read more
The Anarchist Collectives
Workers' self management in the Spanish Revolution 1936-1939, edited by...
Read more
A Small Farm Future
Making the Case for a Society Built Around Local Economies,...
Read more
Rum Lad issue 13
Steve Larder's wonderful illustrated zine, Oct 2020
Read more
I Spy People arguiing with vegans A6
Little booklet, by One Way Ticket to Cubesville, from 1995!
Read more
Move into the Light A6
Move Into the Light: Postscript To A Turbulent 2007
Read more
Deporting Black Britons
Portraits of deportation to Jamaica. By Luke de Noronha, MUP 2020
Read more
An indigenous people's history of the United States
Revisioning American history, by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, Beacon Press 2014
Read more
Mutual Aid
Building solidarity during this crisis (and the next). Dean Spade, Verso...
Read more
Anarchism is Movement
Anarchism is Movement by Tomas Ibanez, 2019, Freedom Press.
Read more
The Trouble with National Action A6
by Mark Hayes, A6 booklet by Freedom Press 2019
Read more
Steps against the war
Resistance to World War 1 in Bedminster. Bristol Radical Pamphleteer...
Read more
God's Beautiful Sunshine
The 1921 Miners’ Lockout in the Forest of Dean. Bristol Radical...
Read more
The Invisible Worker issue 3
Issue 3 of the zine about work and technology.
Read more
Pandemic Solidarity
Mutual aid during the Covid-19 crisis, edited by Marina Sitrin and...
Read more
Great Anarchists
by Ruth Kinna and Clifford Harper, collection of portraits. Dog...
Read more

» All new products